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Aug 17, 2009 7:00pm EDT
those critics as extremists. simply for exercising their first amendment rights. bill tucker has our report. >> reporter: the numbers help explain why there's such passion in the health care debate. 74% say their families or other americans will be helped by obama's proposals, yet at the same time, 83% of americans say they're satisfied with their coverage. people, like craig miller in pennsylvania. >> one day god's going to stand before you and he's going to judge you and the rest of your damn cronies up on the hill. >> reporter: a passion apparently unanticipated and feared by some. some political leaders have been quick to dismiss those voices. >> the groups are not necessarily representative of america. >> reporter: the angriest protestors have been called evil-mongers and accused of being rabid for their dissent. conservative groups like the heritage foundation argue that the mocking and name calling is meant to quiet the debate by making the protestors feel embarrassed and foolish, for being afraid of government and asking questions. heritage notes, six years ago it was the dem
Aug 31, 2009 7:00pm EDT
of a changing economy and a changing workforce. bill tucker reports. >> reporter: conventional wisdom says this is work no american wants or will do. but conventional wisdom isn't always right. jason can atoatest to that. he owns and operates iz belll farms in colorado. he advertised for farm hands, he got an unexpected response. >> when we first put it up, our preconceived notion, if you will is, it's going to be hard to find the right people. we turned down some people that i would have hired in a minute, just because there were other people that were, you know, even better. >> reporter: isabel farms workforce isn't exactly what you might expect to find down on the farm. several hold masters degrees, two are working on degrees in agriculture. another holds a degree in architecture. several are part-time teachers, including the farm's foreman, who explains part of the attraction of the work. >> you get down with a hard's day work and take your boots off and you feel great. it's demanding, it's a lot of hours every week, but, you know, it makes me happy. >> reporter: isabel farms is not un
Aug 27, 2009 7:00pm EDT
on those programs is also in decline. bill tucker reports. >> reporter: california has cut more than $6.6 billion in schools, oregon, $500 billion. that money originally intended to promote innovative educational initiatives and reforms is, instead, being used to fill budget gaps and save jobs, according to the american association of school administrators. >> school administrators find themselves behind a rock and a hard place. there's enormous pressure of positions to keep people as best they can. >> reporter: from a budgetary and educational standpoint, it's a strategy that makes sense. >> live within your means. we are forced with what i consider almost choices because 77, 80% of your budget will be in people, i think teachers and school secretaries and bus drivers and -- >> that part of the budget is education, benefits, and they are trying to get at some of the so-called fixed costs. >> our goal is to everything we can possibly and challenge things that might be fixed. but the problem is, are they really fixed and are there things that we can do about them not only in six months b
Aug 21, 2009 7:00pm EDT
of training hundreds of iraqi soldiers. bill tucker has his story. >> i want to get that decision made up today. >> reporter: arron bert has an innate desire to make a difference. as a citizen he manages capital projects in the seattle parks department. as a soldier, he was in baghdad in 2004. he was one of only four national guard captains charged with training some 700 iraqi security forces. >> we fought in an urban environment that was chaotic. and it was trying to adapt our thinking to a new fight, where reaching out, making connections with the populace, you know, the old adage of winning the hearts and minds, was coming into play, but it wasn't in vogue yet. the job that we were doing was a job that normally special forces, you know, green berets, do. and yet here we're a bunch of national guardsmen. i was a finance analyst at the time with the city of seattle. we had a schoolteacher with us. we had a mechanic who worked on high-end hot rod cars. we had a guy who was actually a sheriff's officer. i mean, we were like a motley band of, you know, the citizen soldier. >> reporter: arro
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4